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Fire & Water - Cleanup & Restoration

Tips for handling a large storm

12/7/2017 (Permalink)

Hurricanes, snow storms and wild weather can wreak havoc in big, densely populated cities and towns. Trees can crash down on power lines and cars. Windows can get blown out. Long lines can form for bread, milk, eggs and fuel. Electrical power and gas service can be interrupted. Public transportation can be terribly delayed, causing difficulties in getting to and from work. Children living in small spaces can get cranky; pets can too. In the worst case scenario, you may even have to evacuate.

Know where to go. If you are ordered to evacuate, know the local hurricane evacuation route(s) to take and have a plan for where you can stay. Contact your local emergency management agency for more information. Put together a disaster supply kit, including a flashlight, batteries, cash, first aid supplies, and copies of your critical information if you need to evacuate If you are not in an area that is advised to evacuate and you decide to stay in your home, plan for adequate supplies in case you lose power and water for several days and you are not able to leave due to flooding or blocked roads. Make a family emergency communication plan. Many communities have text or email alerting systems for emergency notifications. To find out what alerts are available in your area, search the Internet with your town, city, or county name and the word "alerts."

Hurricane winds can cause trees and branches to fall, so before hurricane season trim or remove damaged trees and limbs to keep you and your property safe. Secure loose rain gutters and downspouts and clear any clogged areas or debris to prevent water damage to your property. Reduce property damage by retrofitting to secure and reinforce the roof, windows and doors, including the garage doors. Purchase a portable generator or install a generator for use during power outages. Remember to keep generators and other alternate power/heat sources outside, at least 20 feet away from windows and doors and protected from moisture; and NEVER try to power the house wiring by plugging a generator into a wall outlet.

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